bcthinktank

Archive for October, 2009|Monthly archive page

November 10, 2009. Librarian.net with Jessamyn West. Education in Argentina.

In education on October 26, 2009 at 4:16 pm
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On the first part of today’s show, we’ll have a live interview with Jessamyn West. West is a librarian consultant in rural Vermont.  Her blog, librarian.net, tackles questions about open source and Google, web 2.0, banned books, the law, accessibility, privacy, and more.  We’ll talk with West about the evolving relevance of the librarian in an age of media explosion.  This is Part 3 in our Bloggers and Education series.

On the second half of the show, we’ll listen to an interview with Maria Azkue.  Azkue worked as a lawyer in juvenile crime in Argentina, and now is studying for a Masters in international relations at Brooklyn College.  She shares with us her perspectives on education in Argentina, and gives us a window into her own educational story.  This is part of our World Views Series.

We also talked with Azkue and her husband, Andrew Buckland, about Buckland’s documentary on the Witchi, a native people in Argentina.  You can hear that interview on our Dec. 1 show.

Libraries in 2009:  accessibility, open source, Google books, and more… and an Argentinian laywer’s perspectives on education… coming up.
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Music for today’s show by Paul Brill, Johanna Chase and Evil Art Form.

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The World Views and American Views Series
Our World Views series features interviews with individuals who have been educated primarily abroad.  Most participants in the World Views Series have now moved to the U.S., where they are teaching, studying, working, or parenting.  They share with us their reflections on the widely varying experiences and schools they have encountered.  In our American Views Series, we dive into the experiences of individuals educated primarily in the United States.

Each unique educational biography is meant to provide a prism into the many meanings of education and how it shapes us as individuals.  These conversations are not meant to be sources of authoritative information on educational systems or statistics.

We invite you to respond to the interviews you hear by writing to us at bcthinktank@gmail.com.  If you or someone you know would be a good interviewee for either the American or World Views series, please contact us.

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November 3, 2009: GEMS education. New York City Parents blog.

In education on October 19, 2009 at 4:40 pm
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On the first part of today’s show, we’ll have a live interview with Allison Mattheis.  Mattheis spent five years as a science and math teacher in the Minneapolis public schools, and is now working on a PhD in educational policy and administration.  We discuss Mattheis’s work with GEMS, Girls in Engineering, Math, and Science.  We talk with her about chemically constructing lip gloss, visiting NASA, and building robots and CO2 cars.  Mattheis shares with us her stories about turning her classroom into a workshop and teaching girls to use power tools.
Read more about the GEMS program here, here, and here.

On the second half of the show, we’ll have a live interview with Leonie Haimson.  Haimson is a New York City parent and education advocate.  She blogs at The Huffington Post and at NYC Public School Parents.  Haimson is also Executive Director of Class Size Matters.  We’ll talk about her blogs and her take on the top education issues in NYC on this voting day.  This is Part 2 in our series on Bloggers and Education.

You can read her writing at nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com and at The Huffington Post. If you’re concerned about classroom sizes in New York schools, visit Class Size Matters. Haimson also contributed to NYC Schools Under Bloomberg/Klein:  What Parents, Teachers, and Policy Makers Need to Know.

Girls and power tools… class size and politics… coming up.

Music for today’s show by Paul Brill, Cirkestra, and Evil Art Form.
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Oct. 27, 2009. The Hetrick-Martin Institute. Education in France. Our Courts.

In education on October 8, 2009 at 8:56 pm
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On the first part of today’s show, we’ll have a live interview with Thomas Krever of the Hetrick-Martin Institute.  Hetrick-Martin started as a small organization 30 years ago, and today is a leading provider of social support and programming for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth.  It’s also the home of Harvey Milk High School, the groundbreaking school for LGBTQ youth.  We talk with Thomas Krever about the community at Hetrick-Martin, and a little about Harvey Milk High School.  Visit their website at www.hmi.org.

On the second half of the show, we’ll listen to an interview with David Troyansky, a professor of history at Brooklyn College.  His teaching trajectory brought him from Texas to France and eventually back to Brooklyn, where he was raised.  Our conversation with Prof. Troyansky centered around his time in France.  While he taught in universities, his two young children attended several different schools in Paris and in the countryside.  We discussed his perspectives on French education, as an educator and as a parent.  This is part of our World Views Series.

We’ll end with a conversation about former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s latest project:  a computer game!  Justice O’Connor’s “Our Courts” provides a variety of games for teaching civics to young people. Abby Taylor from Our Courts joins us to talk civics 2.0.  To play the games and view information for both students and teachers visit www.ourcourts.org.

 

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Music for today’s show by Paul Brill, Frustrator, Cirkestra, and Evil Art Form.
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The World Views and American Views Series
Our World Views series features interviews with individuals who have been educated primarily abroad.  Most participants in the World Views Series have now moved to the U.S., where they are teaching, studying, working, or parenting.  They share with us their reflections on the widely varying experiences and schools they have encountered.  In our American Views Series, we dive into the experiences of individuals educated primarily in the United States.

Each unique educational biography is meant to provide a prism into the many meanings of education and how it shapes us as individuals.  These conversations are not meant to be sources of authoritative information on educational systems or statistics.

We invite you to respond to the interviews you hear by writing to us at bcthinktank@gmail.com.  If you or someone you know would be a good interviewee for either the American or World Views series, please contact us.

Oct. 20, 2009: Children’s author Grace Lin. Memoirs of a Jewminicana with Aliza Hausman.

In education on October 1, 2009 at 1:50 pm

On the first half of the show we’ll have a live interview with author and illustrator Grace Lin.  Lin’s award-winning books, such as The Ugly Vegetables and Dim Sum for Everyone!, share a world of color and delight.  Her newest book, Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, tells the tale of Minli, a girl who pursues a trail of fantastical stories — on a quest to save her family from their dreary reality.  We talk with Lin about her inspiration for the tales she spins.

You can visit Grace Lin’s website at gracelin.com.

On the second half of the show, we’ll have a live interview with blogger and author Aliza Hausman.  This is Part 1 in our series Bloggers and Education.  A Dominican-American who converted to Orthodox Judaism in her mid-twenties, Hausman’s writing is honest and perceptive, and very relatable, despite the unique intersections of her identity.  She writes about everything under the sun:  from identity, to faith, racism, hair, etiquette, and more.  We discuss how blogs can help illuminate issues of identity.

Aliza Hausman’s blog, Memoirs of a Jewminicana, and links to her articles, can be found at alizahausman.net.


Tune in this Tuesday as we talk about realities, stories, and identities … coming up.

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Music on today’s show is by Paul Brill, Cirkestra, and Evil Art Form.
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